First steps to investing


There is no right time to begin investing but there are some decisions to make that could affect your returns. If you are 7 years old and saving your pocket money for a PS5, 17 saving the money from your first job for a car, 27 saving for your first house or 57 and finalising your retirement plans which include a dream holiday, we can provide personalised advice for you.


Angela was looking at ways she could reduce her inheritance tax. After spending some time researching, she realised she could make small gifts to as many people as she likes, and these gifts will be exempt from IHT. Wanting to help her grandchildren out, she gifted them £1000 each.


Isabella, Harrison, and Ava were thrilled to receive the generous gift from their grandma and were quick to discuss what they wanted to do with it. After listening to their ambitious ideas, Angela sat the children down and told them that the best thing to do, was to put it into savings and investments to make more out of the money and eventually carry out their future goals.


The surprises of savings accounts

After listening to her grandma, Ava being the youngest of the 3, wasn’t too clued up on savings, so deposited the £1000 into a regular savings account. Regular savings accounts can be great, easy ways to save securely and access money easily, however, they do not make a lot of interest.

With average interest rates for a savings account at 0.06%, Ava looked back into the savings account after a year to discover it had only made £0.60 in interest. The little interest added meant that Ava couldn’t afford the new laptop that she so desperately wanted and had to settle for an older version instead.


Are Cash ISAs still effective?

With the desire to buy a new car, Harrison chose to put his money into a cash ISA after reading about the tax-free, easy to access advantages that they had.

However, Cash ISAs also have a very low interest rate due to the fact they are affected by the rise of the cost of living and high inflation, meaning you make little to no interest on the money that is in there.


The average cash ISA interest rate being 0.63%, Harrison went back to check on his investment after a year and found that it had made £6.32 in interest. Although this interest earned meant that he was unable to put the deposit down for the car he wanted.


Why Stocks & Shares ISAs would’ve been better

Isabella the oldest of the 3 was saving for a deposit on her first home. She found that a stocks and shares ISA was the most appropriate way to invest her money.

Stocks and shares ISAs are a good way to start investing your money as you can invest up to £20,000 a year, any income is protected from tax, and they can offer considerably higher returns over time.


With an average return on stocks and shares ISA being 13.55% if paid yearly, Isabella reviewed her account after a year and was surprised to see that she had made £144.24 of interest on the £1000 she inputted into the ISA. Using this way of investing now means Isabella has the money to be able to pursue her dreams of home ownership.


Let us help

Don’t let what happened to Harrison and Ava, happen to you. Whether you are taking your first steps in investment or a seasoned saver we’re here to guide you through the most suitable ways to invest your money, ensuring your future and you are protected.

The value of your investment and any income from it can fall as well as rise and you may not get back the amount you invested.


Key takeaways:

  • You can reduce IHT by gifting money to family members.

  • Savings accounts are good and easy short-term ways of saving, but don’t offer good interest.

  • Cash ISAs are tax-free, easy ways of saving money but can interest rates can easily be affected by rise in the cost of living and higher inflation.

  • Stocks and shares ISA are tax-free ways of saving with considerably higher returns over time.

0 views